KNOW YOUR INJURY:

Achilles Tendinosis/ Tendinitis

KNOW YOUR INJURY:

Achilles Tendinosis/ Tendinitis

KNOW YOUR INJURY:

Achilles Tendinosis / Tendinitis

What is Achilles Tendinitis?

Achilles Tendonitis, or tendinopathy is pain and inflammation in the tendon joining your calf muscles to your heel and is very common in athletes such as joggers and jumpers where the sport results in repetitive strain. The condition can affect anyone however and is more likely to occur if you have abnormal ankle and foot mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

The Achilles tendon is the largest and toughest tendon in your body and is required to withstand high impact forces when jumping, running and landing on your toes.

Your Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply so recovery is slower than usual. What may seem as a sudden injury or tear has most likely occurred over a long period of overuse and subtle repetitive strain, which causes minor tears, gradually resulting in loss of mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

Stage 1: The tissue surrounding you Achilles tendon gets irritated.

Stage 2: The Achilles tendon gets irritated causing a sharp pain with exercise.

Stage 3: Continued strain with out recovery results in tendon weakness and snapping.

What causes Achilles Tendinitis?

Often tendon strain occurs because you are doing too much, too soon. Lack of conditioning to specific training regimes, equipment and surfaces, such as hill running, new shoes or changing from track to grass, can place strain on the tendon as it tries to adapt. Over pronation (flat feet) , decreased foot/ankle/hip/knee mobility and balance as well as leg muscle weakness can predispose tendons to compensatory strain.

Initially, the repetitive microtrauma may not be felt as pain but if one does not rest, heal and adapt, degeneration occurs and the tissue can become 'sick'.

Over-time, a chronic syndrome develops that affects the entire lower kinematic chain from your low back to your foot and ankle. This becomes very challenging to treat.

The common anecdote of a car's wheel alignment applies well in this case. The 'imbalanced' wheel takes extra strain with use and eventually will wear out faster than the others. You can replace the wheel, but unless you fix the cause of the problem, the new wheel is still going to wear out. Over time, other parts of the car begin to compensate and take strain and eventually you are left with a complicated syndrome that requires a holistic recovery approach, focusing on the full lower kinematic chain as a biomechanical unit.

3 STEP DIAGNOSIS

We've put together a 3 Step Self-Examination Quiz to help you figure out if you might have Achilles Tendinitis. 

What are the risk factors for Achilles Tendinitis?

Athletes who participate in high-impact activities such as running and jumping are at risks for developing Achilles tendinitis. While anybody can be affected by this condition, there are certain risk factors that increase your likelihood of developing Achilles tendinitis:

  • Age: As you age you’re more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis. Middle-aged people who play sports are more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis.

    Sex: Men are more likely to experience Achilles tendinitis.

    High impacts sports: Active individuals, particularly those who take part in high impact sports are more likely to be affected by Achilles tendinitis.

    Training styles: Doing too much too soon or training infrequently, such as only on weekends can add strain to the tendon.

    Physical conditions: Pronation, decreased foot/ankle mobility and balance, as well as muscle weakness in the legs can predispose the tendon to strain.

  •  

How do I prevent Achilles Tendinitis?

Evidence-based clinical trials have shown that consistent, controlled eccentric exercises are your best defense!

The ZlaantBoard and Circuit (included in the box) follows a dynamic, yet simple, daily exercise routine that incorporates these findings, focussing on quality of movement as well as strength and mobility, through a range of proprioceptive exercises that target the lower kinematic chain.

By incorporating the ZlaantBoard into your daily warm up routine, we will help you to recover, prevent, perform and GET BACK OUT THERE!


If you believe you’re suffering from Achilles Tendinitis but have not yet received a formal diagnosis, we advise that you visit your chiropractor or healthcare practitioner to confirm your condition and rule out any more serious conditions that may be contributing to your symptoms.



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What is Achilles Tendinitis?

Achilles Tendonitis, or tendinopathy is pain and inflammation in the tendon joining your calf muscles to your heel and is very common in athletes such as joggers and jumpers where the sport results in repetitive strain. The condition can affect anyone however and is more likely to occur if you have abnormal ankle and foot mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

The Achilles tendon is the largest and toughest tendon in your body and is required to withstand high impact forces when jumping, running and landing on your toes.

Your Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply so recovery is slower than usual. What may seem as a sudden injury or tear has most likely occurred over a long period of overuse and subtle repetitive strain, which causes minor tears, gradually resulting in loss of mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

Stage 1: The tissue surrounding you Achilles tendon gets irritated.

Stage 2: The Achilles tendon gets irritated causing a sharp pain with exercise.

Stage 3: Continued strain with out recovery results in tendon weakness and snapping.

What is Achilles Tendinitis?

Achilles Tendonitis, or tendinopathy is pain and inflammation in the tendon joining your calf muscles to your heel and is very common in athletes such as joggers and jumpers where the sport results in repetitive strain. The condition can affect anyone however and is more likely to occur if you have abnormal ankle and foot mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

The Achilles tendon is the largest and toughest tendon in your body and is required to withstand high impact forces when jumping, running and landing on your toes.

Your Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply so recovery is slower than usual. What may seem as a sudden injury or tear has most likely occurred over a long period of overuse and subtle repetitive strain, which causes minor tears, gradually resulting in loss of mobility, strength and proprioceptive function.

Stage 1: The tissue surrounding you Achilles tendon gets irritated.

Stage 2: The Achilles tendon gets irritated causing a sharp pain with exercise.

Stage 3: Continued strain with out recovery results in tendon weakness and snapping.

What causes Achilles Tendinitis?

Often tendon strain occurs because you are doing too much, too soon. Lack of conditioning to specific training regimes, equipment and surfaces, such as hill running, new shoes or changing from track to grass, can place strain on the tendon as it tries to adapt. Over pronation (flat feet) , decreased foot/ankle/hip/knee mobility and balance as well as leg muscle weakness can predispose tendons to compensatory strain.

Initially, the repetitive microtrauma may not be felt as pain but if one does not rest, heal and adapt, degeneration occurs and the tissue can become 'sick'.

Over-time, a chronic syndrome develops that affects the entire lower kinematic chain from your low back to your foot and ankle. This becomes very challenging to treat.

The common anecdote of a car's wheel alignment applies well in this case. The 'imbalanced' wheel takes extra strain with use and eventually will wear out faster than the others. You can replace the wheel, but unless you fix the cause of the problem, the new wheel is still going to wear out. Over time, other parts of the car begin to compensate and take strain and eventually you are left with a complicated syndrome that requires a holistic recovery approach, focusing on the full lower kinematic chain as a biomechanical unit.

What causes Achilles Tendinitis?

Often tendon strain occurs because you are doing too much, too soon. Lack of conditioning to specific training regimes, equipment and surfaces, such as hill running, new shoes or changing from track to grass, can place strain on the tendon as it tries to adapt. Over pronation (flat feet) , decreased foot/ankle/hip/knee mobility and balance as well as leg muscle weakness can predispose tendons to compensatory strain.

Initially, the repetitive microtrauma may not be felt as pain but if one does not rest, heal and adapt, degeneration occurs and the tissue can become 'sick'.

Over-time, a chronic syndrome develops that affects the entire lower kinematic chain from your low back to your foot and ankle. This becomes very challenging to treat.

The common anecdote of a car's wheel alignment applies well in this case. The 'imbalanced' wheel takes extra strain with use and eventually will wear out faster than the others. You can replace the wheel, but unless you fix the cause of the problem, the new wheel is still going to wear out. Over time, other parts of the car begin to compensate and take strain and eventually you are left with a complicated syndrome that requires a holistic recovery approach, focusing on the full lower kinematic chain as a biomechanical unit.

3 STEP DIAGNOSIS

We've put together a 3 Step Self-Examination Quiz to help you figure out if you might have Achilles Tendinitis. 

3 STEP DIAGNOSIS

We've put together a 3 Step Self-Examination Quiz to help you figure out if you might have Achilles Tendinitis. 

What are the risk factors for Achilles Tendinitis?

Athletes who participate in high-impact activities such as running and jumping are at risks for developing Achilles tendinitis. While anybody can be affected by this condition, there are certain risk factors that increase your likelihood of developing Achilles tendinitis, including:

Age: As you age you’re more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis. Middle-aged people who play sports are more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis.

Sex: Men are more likely to experience Achilles tendinitis.

High impacts sports: Active individuals, particularly those who take part in high impact sports are more likely to be affected by Achilles tendinitis.

Training styles: Doing too much too soon or training infrequently, such as only on weekends can add strain to the tendon.

Physical conditions: Pronation, decreased foot/ankle mobility and balance, as well as muscle weakness in the legs can predispose the tendon to strain.

What are the risk factors for Achilles Tendinitis?

Athletes who participate in high-impact activities such as running and jumping are at risks for developing Achilles tendinitis. While anybody can be affected by this condition, there are certain risk factors that increase your likelihood of developing Achilles tendinitis:

  • Age: As you age you’re more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis. Middle-aged people who play sports are more likely to develop Achilles tendinitis.

    Sex: Men are more likely to experience Achilles tendinitis.

    High impacts sports: Active individuals, particularly those who take part in high impact sports are more likely to be affected by Achilles tendinitis.

    Training styles: Doing too much too soon or training infrequently, such as only on weekends can add strain to the tendon.

    Physical conditions: Pronation, decreased foot/ankle mobility and balance, as well as muscle weakness in the legs can predispose the tendon to strain.

How do I prevent Achilles Tendinitis?

Evidence-based clinical trials have shown that consistent, controlled eccentric exercises are your best defense!

The ZlaantBoard and Circuit (included in the box) follows a dynamic, yet simple, daily exercise routine that incorporates these findings, focussing on quality of movement as well as strength and mobility, through a range of proprioceptive exercises that target the lower kinematic chain.

By incorporating the ZlaantBoard into your daily warm up routine, we will help you to recover, prevent, perform and GET BACK OUT THERE!

How do I prevent Achilles Tendinitis?

Evidence-based clinical trials have shown that consistent, controlled eccentric exercises are your best defense!

The ZlaantBoard and Circuit (included in the box) follows a dynamic, yet simple, daily exercise routine that incorporates these findings, focussing on quality of movement as well as strength and mobility, through a range of proprioceptive exercises that target the lower kinematic chain.

By incorporating the ZlaantBoard into your daily warm up routine, we will help you to recover, prevent, perform and GET BACK OUT THERE!


If you believe you’re suffering from Achilles Tendinitis but have not yet received a formal diagnosis, we advise that you visit your chiropractor or healthcare practitioner to confirm your condition and rule out any more serious conditions that may be contributing to your symptoms.



If you believe you’re suffering from Achilles Tendinitis but have not yet received a formal diagnosis, we advise that you visit your chiropractor or healthcare practitioner to confirm your condition and rule out any more serious conditions that may be contributing to your symptoms.



LIKE, FOLLOW, SHARE...
JOIN THE ZLAANT COMMUNITY


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